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Friday, August 11, 2006

Chemistry, Biology and Life Sciences Lectures.

This time Chemistry, Biology and other Life Sciences lectures.


Introduction to Solid State Chemistry
This course explores the basic principles of chemistry and their application to engineering systems. It deals with the relationship between electronic structure, chemical bonding, and atomic order. It also investigates the characterization of atomic arrangements in crystalline and amorphous solids: metals, ceramics, semiconductors, and polymers (including proteins). Topics covered include organic chemistry, solution chemistry, acid-base equilibria, electrochemistry, biochemistry, chemical kinetics, diffusion, and phase diagrams. Examples are drawn from industrial practice (including the environmental impact of chemical processes), from energy generation and storage, e.g., batteries and fuel cells, and from emerging technologies, e.g., photonic and biomedical devices.


Principles of Chemical Science
5.111 is an introductory chemistry course, emphasizing basic principles of atomic and molecular electronic structure, thermodynamics, acid-base and redox equilibria, chemical kinetics, and catalysis. This course also introduces the chemistry of biological, inorganic, and organic molecules.

Course covers:
Atomic Theory of Matter, Discovery of Nucleus, Wavelike Properties of Radiation, Particle-like Nature of Light, Matter As a Wave Problem, The Hydrogen Atom, Hydrogen Atom Wavefunctions Problem, P Orbitals, Electronic Structure of Multielectron Atoms, Periodic Trends in Elemental Properties Problem, Covalent Bonds, Lewis Diagrams, Breakdown of Octet Rule, Molecular Orbital Theory Problem, Valence Bond Theory and Hybridization, Hybridization and Chemical Bonding, Bond Energies / Bond Enthalpies Problem, Free Energy of Formation, Chemical Equilibrium, Acid-Base Equilibrium, Acid-Base Equilibrium: Titrations, Acid Base Titrations and Oxidation/Reduction, Oxidation/Reduction, Transition Metals, Transition Metals: Crystal Field Theory, The Shapes of Molecules: VSEPR Theory Problem, Transition Metals, Kinetics, Kinetics: Catalysis, Course Review



Principles of Chemical Science
5.112 is an introductory chemistry course for students with an unusually strong background in chemistry. Knowledge of calculus equivalent to 18.01 is recommended. Emphasis is on basic principles of atomic and molecular electronic structure, thermodynamics, acid-base and redox equilibria, chemical kinetics, and catalysis. The course also covers applications of basic principles to problems in metal coordination chemistry, organic chemistry, and biological chemistry.


Introduction to Chemistry
Course covers:
Atoms, Molecules, Stoichiometry, Atomic Structure, Molecular Formulae, Reactions in Solution, Light waves, Absorption, Emission, Light, Particles, Photons, Matter: Particles/Waves, Quantum Particles in 1-Dimension, Quantum Mechanics: H Atom, QM Orbitals, Radiation and Matter, Many Electron Atoms, Spin, Pauli Principle, Electronic Configuration, Periodic Properties, Trends, Chemical Bonds, Lewis Structures, Covalent Bonding, Resonance, Oxidation Numbers, Formal Charge, Molecular Structure, VSEPR, Isomers, Colavent Bonding, Molecular Orbitals, Hybridization, Molecular Orbitals, Resonance, Ideal Gases, Kinetic Theory, Absolute Temperature, Real Gases, Phase Transitions, Thermodynamics: First Law, Thermochemistry, Enthalpy, Calorimetry, Human Thermochemsitry, Bond Energies, Entropy, Second Law, Free Energy, Direction of Change, Equilibrium, Mass Action, Equilibrium, Temperature, Le Chatelier, Free Energy, Equilibrium Constant, Heterogeneous Equilibrium, Strong Acids and Bases, Weak Acids and Bases, Titration of Weak Acids, Buffers, Indicators, Acid Strength, Amino Acids, Polyprotic Acids, Reduction Potentials, Galvanic Cells, Chemistry vs. Biochemistry, Nuclear and Radiochemistry, Nuclear and Radiochemistry, Nuclear Applications, UC Berkeley and the Actinides



Chemical Structure and Reactivity
Course covers:
Delocalized Pi Systems, Electronic Spectroscopy, Aromatic Compounds, Electrophilic Aromatic Substitution, Aldehydes, Ketones, No Webcast, Enols, Enones, Carboxylic Acids, Carboxylic Acid Derivatives and Mass Spectroscopy, Amines, Chemistry of Arenes, Diketones and Hydroxyketones, Carbohydrates, Heterocycles, Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins



Astrophysical Chemistry
  • Lecture 1
    Introduction: Overview of the Universe, its component parts e.g. galaxies, stars, planets etc.
    Provided by The Vega Science Trust.

  • Lecture 2
    Introduction to atomic and molecular spectroscopy, particularly rotational spectroscopy. Spectra from space.
    Provided by The Vega Science Trust.

  • Lecture 3
    The spectra of the interstellar medium: From nebulae, interstellar species, H 21cm radiation and the structure of our Milky Way Galaxy.
    Provided by The Vega Science Trust.

  • Lecture 4
    Origin of the elements and the formation of molecules in the interstellar medium: Big Bang synthesis, stellar synthesis of He and C and other elements, interstellar scattering, interstellar species such as carbon monoxide and more complex molecules.
    Provided by The Vega Science Trust.


  • Lecture 5
    The development of molecular radio astronomy and infra red techniques and the information they yield on the composition of the interstellar medium: interstellar clouds, stellar envelopes etc.
    Provided by The Vega Science Trust.


  • Lecture 6
    Optical (electronic) spectra from space: comets. The detection of the pulsar in the Crab Nebula. The Three Degree Background. The detection by spectroscopy of the birth of stars.
    Provided by The Vega Science Trust.


  • Lecture 7
    Electronic spectroscopy and Franck Condon factors. The discovery of the spectrum of H3+ in the laboratory and in the atmosphere of Jupiter. Interstellar chemistry: Ion molecule reactions in space, grain surface catalysed processes and reactions in circumstellar shell. Interstellar masers.
    Provided by The Vega Science Trust.


  • Lecture 8
    Radio astronomy - resolution issues. The detection of long carbon chain molecules by radio astronomy. The conjectures on the origin of the chains in space and their possible relationship with the Diffuse Interstellar Bands that initiated the experiments that uncovered the existence of the C60 molecule. C60 extraction and interstellar dust.
    Provided by The Vega Science Trust.


  • Website
A series of lectures on astrophysical chemistry delivered to undergrate students at Florida State University in 2004


C60, the Celestial Sphere that Fell to Earth
In 1985 an experiment, designed to unravel the carbon chemistry in Red Giant Stars, revealed the existence of C60 Buckminsterfullerene (the third allotropic form of carbon). The story of the discovery and the way its symmetry relates to the natural and physical world are described. This elegant cage molecule which has the same shape as a football heralds a new era of novel 21st Century Materials.

Provided by The Vega Science Trust.



Introduction to Biology
The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material.
This MIT course is a fine alternative to classes from an online biology degree program and its free.
7.012 focuses on the exploration of current research in cell biology, immunology, neurobiology, genomics, and molecular medicine.



Introductory Biology (Audio Only)
The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material.
7.013 focuses on the application of the fundamental principles toward an understanding of human biology. Topics include genetics, cell biology, molecular biology, disease (infectious agents, inherited diseases and cancer), developmental biology, neurobiology and evolution.



Introductory Biology
The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material.
7.014 focuses on the application of these fundamental principles, toward an understanding of microorganisms as geochemical agents responsible for the evolution and renewal of the biosphere and of their role in human health and disease.



General Biology
Course covers:
Life: An Overview; Basic Chemistry, redox, PH, Biopolymers: Carbohydrates, Lipids, Nucleic Acids, Protein Structure, Biological Membranes, Bacterial Cells; Animals Cells and Organelles, Energy, Thermodynamics and Enzymes 1, Enzymes 2, Metabolism I: ATP, Redox and Glycolysis, Metabolism II: TCA Cycle; Oxid, Phos., Photosynthesis: Light and Dark Reactions, Signaling, Genes to Proteins: An Overview, Techniques in Molecular Biology, Microbial Genetics and Evolution - Chromosomes, Plasmids, and Phage, DNA Replication and the PCR, Cell Cycle, Mitosis and Reproduction of Cells, Chromosomes, Checkpoints, and Cancer, Meiosis and Sexual Life Cycle, Gregor Mendel and Two of Biology's Three Laws, Recombination, Linkage and Mapping, Transcription, The Genetic Code and Traslation, Prokaryotic Gene Regulation, Eukaryotic Gene Expression and Regulation, Human Genetics and Epigenetics, GMOs and Organismal Cloning, Stem Cells and Aging, Midterm II, Multicellularity: Cell Shape and Function, Tissue Specialization, Homeostasis, Intercellular and Physiological Communication: Hormones, Receptors, and the Endocrine System, Reproductive System, Fertilization and Embryogenesis, Developmental Strategies and Mechanisms, Digestive System, Circulatory and Respiratory Systems, Immune System, Excretory System and Kidney Function, Nervous System, Cell and Tissue Dysfunction, Cancer and Experimental Stratefies to Develp Anti-Cancer Therapeutics, Bio-Engineered Animals and Models of Human Disease


General Biology Lab
Course covers:
Safety, Equipment and Ligation, Transformation and Cells, Enzymes, Photosynthesis, Presidents Day, Genetics and Molecular Biology I, Genetics and Molecular Biology II, Invertebrates I, Question and Answer, Spring Break, Invertebrates II, Rat Anatomy, Reproduction and Development, Chordate Diversity



General Biology
Course covers:
Introduction/Fungi, Algae, Mosses, Lower Vascular Plants, Ferns and Gymnosperms, Angiosperms, Cells, Tissues, Roots, Structure and Development, Shoots, Primary Structure, Shoots, Secondary Structure, Plant Growth Substances, Flowering, Water Relations, Water Relations, Mineral Nutrition, Presidents Day, Mineral Nutrition, Fruit Development, Discussion of Midterm, Darwin and The Origin, Explanatory Power, Mendel, Hardy, and Weinberg, Mutation and Selection, Genetic Drift and Gene Flow, Sex and Sexual Selection, Biological Species, Modes of Speciation, Macroevolution, Phlogenetic Systematics, Molecular Phylogenetics, Precambrian and Paleozoic, Mesozoic and Cenozoic, Generalizations About the Fossil Record, Review, Control of Onchocerciasis: What we will study in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Population Growth, Dynamics of Populations, Demography, Organism Interactions and Competition, Ecological Studies, Communities, Island Biogeography, Ecosystems, Aquatic Ecosystems, San Francisco Bay, Microevolution & Natural Selection, Humans and the Environment, Course Review



Structural Aspects of Biomaterials
Course covers:
Course Overview, Biocompatibility/FDA Regulatory Agency, Orthopedics, Case Study: Sulzer Recall, Case Study: Hip Implant Corrosion, Final Project Outline, Sterilization Case Study, Wear in Total Joint Replacements, Total Shoulder Replacements; Contact Stress, Contact Stress in Devices; Stress Shielding, Guest Lecture: Dr. Michael Ries, Chief of Arthoroplasty, UCSF, UHMWPE Fatigue, Fatigue Design, Guest Lecture: Dr. Andy Kohm, Spinal Implants, Kyphon, Defect Tolerant Philosophy, Guest Lecture: Professor Rob Ritchie, Fracture in Minerized Tissues, MSME, Dental Materials, Guest Lecture: Vascular Mechanics, In Class Demonstrations: Knee, HIp, Dental, Cardio, Guest Lecture: Dr. Scott Robertson, Stents: Fatigue and Fracture, LBL, Guest Lecture: Dr. Alan Pelton, Stent Design, Nitinol Device Company (NDC), Midterm, No Lecture, Soft Tissue Reconstruction, Breast Implants, Exam Solutions, Wrap-up, No Lecture, Student Presentations



Structural Aspects of Biomaterials
Course covers:
Case Study: Spinal Disc Replacement, Mechanics, Notes on Principal Stresses & Mohr's Circle, Stresses Due to Bending, Presidents Day, Failure of a Posterier Stabalized Total Knee Replacement, Practical Applications of Fatigue, Biological Responses and Biocompatibility, How Fracture and Fatigue are Used in Industry, Homework Problem Overview, Motivation Problem Definition, Design Requirements, Deliverable 2; Homework 6, How to give a Technical Presentation



The Origin of Life
In modern organisms, there is a division of labour between two kinds of molecule: DNA, which stores and transmits genetic information, and proteins, which do all the work. They are connected by the 'genetic code', whereby DNA specifies what kinds of proteins can be made. This process of translation is well understood, but it is far too complicated to have arisen by chance in the primitive oceans. How can this apparent paradox be resolved?

Provided by The Vega Science Trust.



Self-Assembly: Nature's way to do it
Biology operates at two levels: the large scale which we can see and the underlying microscopic one. The amazing way in which intermolecular forces cause protein arrays to self-assemble, enabling Nature to fabricate the large scale components of living systems is described.

Provided by The Vega Science Trust.



Genomics and Computational Biology (Audio only)
This course will assess the relationships among sequence, structure, and function in complex biological networks as well as progress in realistic modeling of quantitative, comprehensive, functional genomics analyses. Exercises will include algorithmic, statistical, database, and simulation approaches and practical applications to medicine, biotechnology, drug discovery, and genetic engineering. Future opportunities and current limitations will be critically addressed. In addition to the regular lecture sessions, supplementary sections are scheduled to address issues related to Perl, Mathematica and biology.


Genomic Medicine (Audio only)
This course reviews the key genomic technologies and computational approaches that are driving advances in prognostics, diagnostics, and treatment. Throughout the semester, emphasis will return to issues surrounding the context of genomics in medicine including: what does a physician need to know? what sorts of questions will s/he likely encounter from patients? how should s/he respond? Lecturers will guide the student through real world patient-doctor interactions. Outcome considerations and socioeconomic implications of personalized medicine are also discussed. The first part of the course introduces key basic concepts of molecular biology, computational biology, and genomics. Continuing in the informatics applications portion of the course, lecturers begin each lecture block with a scenario, in order to set the stage and engage the student by showing: why is this important to know? how will the information presented be brought to bear on medical practice? The final section presents the ethical, legal, and social issues surrounding genomic medicine. A vision of how genomic medicine relates to preventative care and public health is presented in a discussion forum with the students where the following questions are explored: what is your level of preparedness now? what challenges must be met by the healthcare industry to get to where it needs to be?


Neuroscience and Behavior (Audio only)
This course covers the relation of structure and function at various levels of neuronal integration. Topics include functional neuroanatomy and neurophysiology, sensory and motor systems, centrally programmed behavior, sensory systems, sleep and dreaming, motivation and reward, emotional displays of various types, "higher functions" and the neocortex, and neural processes in learning and memory.

Lecture topics:
Introduction to Brain-behavior Studies, History and Goals, Cellular Mechanisms, Neuronal Conduction and Transmission, Synapses Neuroanatomical Techniques, Introduction to CNS and its Evolution, Evolution, Brain Subdivisions Channels of Conduction, Transection Effects Neocortex, Spinal Cord Autonomic NS, Hindbrain and Midbrain, Midbrain and Forebrain, Development of CNS, Introduction, Cell migration Axon Growth Stages, Influences on Axon Growth, Axonal Sprouting and Regeneration, Motor System, Rythmic Outputs, Rhythms of Activity Sleep and Waking, Sleep and Waking, Habituation, Novelty Responses, Visual System Anatomy, Ablations, Physiology, Ablation Studies, Ablations, Visual System Conclusion, Auditory System, Pain and Central Gray Area, Hypothalamus and Feeding, Drive, Reward Agonistic Behavior, Higher Functions Human Nature, Human Nature and Neuroscience, Conclusion, Course Review



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