Free Science and Video Lectures Online!
Free education online is possible.

Great news! New Science Site launched: Free Science Videos and Lectures

Another great news! My Programming Site launched: Good coders code, great reuse

Finding new lectures takes a lot of effort.
If you find my work valuable, I'd appreciate a gift from my Amazon.com Wish List! Thanks!

Wednesday, October 31, 2012

New Richard Feynman Video Lectures and Talks

Hey everyone, this month I've more Richard Feynman video lectures and talks. The talks include: Feynman on Computers, Feynman on Nanotechnology, Feynman on Los Alamos, Lawrence Krauss on Richard Feynman's Life in Science, and Feynman's Dirac Memorial Lecture.


Richard Feynman on Computers


Lecture description:
Richard Feynman, Winner of the 1965 Nobel Prize in Physics, gives us an insightful lecture about computer heuristics: How computers work, how they file information, how they handle data, how they use their information in allocated processing in a finite amount of time to solve problems and how they actually compute values of interest to human beings. These topics are essential in the study of what processes reduce the amount of work done in solving a particular problem in computers, giving them speeds of solving problems that can outmatch humans in certain fields but which have not yet reached the complexity of human driven intelligence. The question if human thought is a series of fixed processes that could be, in principle, imitated by a computer is a major theme of this lecture and, in Feynman's trademark style of teaching, gives us clear and yet very powerful answers for this field which has gone on to consume so much of our lives today. No doubt this lecture will be of crucial interest to anyone who has ever wondered about the process of human or machine thinking and if a synthesis between the two can be made without violating logic.


Richard Feynman's Nanotechnology Lecture


Lecture description:
Richard Feynman gave his famous talk "There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom" on December 29th 1959 at the annual meeting of the American Physical Society at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) as his vision on how physics and engineering could move in the direction that could eventually create nanotechnology. Really good ideas and strokes of genius are often manifest in the right questions being asked: How small can information be encoded? How can information be written? How can information it be read? All of these important "Hows" were asked by Feynman in a time when computers had to be put in large rooms and when the impending space race was forcing engineers to do some serious strategic thinking in making technology small enough to be lifted by rockets into space to function as serious tools in scientific exploration and defence. Feynman himself may not have invented the technology we see in the development and continuity of the computer age, but the fact that even in the early 1960's nanotechnology was being considered as a serious field of study was definitely a factor contributing to the boom in computer technology seen in the late 20th century and continues to reach more spectacular levels of sophistication in the 21st century. In this lecture, Feynman tries to retell his 1959 lecture from a more modern perspective in that many aspects of his vision have been full filled, particularly with the invention of the electron microscope, the atomic force microscope and experimental manipulation of the atomic scale of matter. Also discussed is the current practical field of photolithography for the manufacture of bipolar transistors and junctions used in computer chips done on an industrial scale and how this process continues with ever decreasing wavelength capabilities of lasers from UV to X-rays. Feynman also discusses the boundaries of miniaturisation and how the scale differences affect the function of certain aspects of technology as well as in nature.


Richard Feynman's Los Alamos from Below Lecture


Lecture description:
This is the Physicist Richard Feynman recalling his activities at Los Alamos during the World War II. This track is from an accompanying CD to the book "Classic Feynman: All the Adventures of a Curious Character" by Ralph Leighton, published by W. W. Norton.


Quantum Man: Richard Feynman's Life in Science


Lecture description:
Perhaps the greatest physicist of the second half of the twentieth century, Richard Feynman changed the way we think about quantum mechanics, the most perplexing of all physical theories. Here Lawrence M. Krauss, himself a theoretical physicist and best-selling author, offers a unique scientific biography: a rollicking narrative coupled with clear and novel expositions of science at the limits. An immensely colorful persona in and out of the office, Feynman revolutionized our understanding of nature amid a turbulent life. Krauss presents that life—from the death of Feynman’s childhood sweetheart during the Manhattan Project to his reluctant rise as a scientific icon—as seen through the science, providing a new understanding of the legacy of a man who has fascinated millions. An accessible reflection on the issues that drive physics today, Quantum Man captures the story of a man who was willing to break all the rules to tame a theory that broke all the rules.


Elementary Particles and the Laws of Physics (1986 Dirac memorial lecture)


Lecture description:
Developing a theory that seamlessly combines relativity and quantum mechanics, the most important conceptual breakthroughs in twentieth century physics, has proved to be a difficult and ongoing challenge. This book details how two distinguished physicists and Nobel laureates have explored this theme in two lectures given in Cambridge, England, in 1986 to commemorate the famous British physicist Paul Dirac. Given for nonspecialists and undergraduates, the talks transcribed in Elementary Particles and the Laws of Physics focus on the fundamental problems of physics and the present state of our knowledge. Professor Feynman examines the nature of antiparticles, and in particular the relationship between quantum spin and statistics.

Related Posts

  • Free Physics Video and Audio Courses
    (Includes descriptive physics, classical mechanics, introductory physics, electricity and magnetism, vibrations and waves, symmetry and tensors)

  • More Physics Video Courses
    (Includes physics for non-science majors, mechanical universe lecture series, elementary college physics, and astrophysics)

  • Even More Physics Videos
    (Includes videos for general public on string theory, universe and particle smashers, then more advanced videos on string theory, particle physics, cosmology and physics demonstrations)

  • Free Physics Video Lectures
    (Includes quantum mechanics, quantum physics, classical physics, classical mechanics, chaos, fractals and dynamical systems, linear dynamical systems, heat and mass transfer and general relativity.)

  • Even More Physics Videos and Video Lectures
    (Lots of Richard P. Feynman lectures, compexity and chaos, universe in a nutshell, black holes, life in space, states of matter, chemistry of interstellar space, electricity and magnetism, nanophysics and many others)

  • Modern Physics
    (Includes Quantum Physics, Quantum Mechanics, Quantum Field Theory, Applied Group Theory, General Relativity, Cosmology, Astrophysics, Computational Physics, Thermodynamics and a lecture on Basic Physics)

  • More Modern Physics
    (Includes Special Relativity, General Relativity, Quantum Mechanics, Cosmology, Einstein's Theory, Quantum Entanglements, LHC, Dirac Strings, and Explorations of 4th Dimension. Graduate Classical Mechanics and Lee Smolin)

  • Endlessly More Physics
    (Includes CERN summer school videos (particle physics and LHC). Videos from Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics. Physics Talks from Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics. Lectures on String Theory, Black Holes, Fundamental Laws of Nature, Dark Matter, Moon, and search for new Suns. Lecture on Fluid dynamics. Astrophysics Workshop. Videos from Institute of Advanced Study. And some bonus lectures on geometry of manifolds, on evolutionary dynamics, and solving cubic equations)

  • String Theory, Quantum Computation and Others
    (Includes 3 hour video series of The Elegant Universe - the theory about unifying all four fundamental forces and the string theory, various lectures from princeton university on black holes and others, historical perspectives of Hans Bethe and quantum computation by David Deutsch)

  • Popular Science Physics Video Lectures
    (Includes Richard Feynman's Messenger Video Lectures, an interview with Richard Feynman, video of young Albert Einstein, explanation of Schrodinger's cat, ferrofluid, a trip inside LHC, video on quantum computing, upcoming revolutions in theoretical physics, video interview about multiverse and parallel universes, 100 greatest physics discoveries, and discovery of fullorene.)

  • Various Physics Lectures
    (Includes Escher and Droste effect, Sir Roger Penrose and new physics, Feynman, Nikola Tesla, gyroscopes, black holes, dark matter, dark energy, modern cosmology, origins of universe, theoretical physics, particle hydrodynamics, numeric relativity, plasma, astrophysics, superstring theory, LHC, gravity, OLED technology, lasers)

0 Comments:

Post a Comment

<< Home